Our performance in detail

5
Kaupapa Pāpori me ngā Mahi a Rēhia
Social and recreation

This chapter profiles our strategic approach, challenges and what we delivered in the social and recreation area, which includes recreation promotion and support, community support, and public health and safety.

Snapshot of the city

Snapshot

5 Kaupapa Pāpori me ngā Mahi a Rēhia
Social and recreation Top

Introduction

Our focus in this area is on recreation provision, social initiatives and community support, and public health and safety. People are at the heart of everything we do, from providing shelter and support to our most vulnerable residents to investing in infrastructure such as halls and sportsgrounds to meet community needs. We try to make sure people have access to services and activities that help them lead healthy, connected lives.

Our strategic approach to securing a highly liveable, safe and inclusive community is to encourage active and healthy lifestyles, enable participation in sporting and other group activities, deliver quality recreation and social services, provide access to housing for those in need, and carry out our public health functions.

Many organisations contribute to residents’ health and safety, and to community strength. The Council’s approach includes supporting those organisations by playing a facilitation and funding role. We manage and maintain swimming pools, sportsgrounds and playgrounds, and community halls and centres.

Some of the challenges we face include addressing changing recreational patterns and balancing rising community demand and expectations of services against the pressure on costs to ratepayers. We also need to address a rise in street begging and homelessness and the needs of an ageing and increasingly diverse population.

Social and recreation performance story:

Drop in recreation satisfaction, begging a concern

The number of residents who agree that Wellington offers a wide range of recreation activities dropped 6 percent to 79 percent. Among the top reasons people gave for this was lack of time, cost of activities and lack of motivation. The number of people using libraries rose 8 percent to 82 percent. There was a notable increase in the number of people who are satisfied with the online library collection – this rose 16 percent to 87 percent.

In a survey measuring residents’ perception of city and community safety issues, 56 percent noted begging was a concern. There is no comparative figure for this particular measure as this is a new survey category.

Source: Wellington City Council Residents monitoring survey 2018

Not met or decreased

79%

of survey respondents agree that Wellington offers a wide range of recreation activities

Among the top reasons people gave for this was lack of time, cost of activities and lack of motivation.

85% in 2016/17

 
Not measured or not comparable

19%

of survey respondents agree that there are barriers to participating in recreation activities

Refer supplementary tables – questions and categories changed this year.

 
Not measured or not comparable

56%

of survey respondents identified “begging” as particularly concerning in Wellington

“Begging” was a new survey category under city and community safety issues of most concern, added this year.


 
Positive Result

82%


Residents (%) who use our libraries

74% in 2016/17

 
Positive Result

71%


of survey respondents who state they use Wellington libraries more than once a month

65% in 2016/17

 
Positive Result

86%

Target 75%

E-library users (%) who are satisfied with the online library collection

86% in 2016/17


 
Within 5% or no change

3.89m

Target 2.5 million

Library website visits.
Target was exceeded due to the including usage counts of the Wellington Central Library mini app as visits to the Library website

3.94m in 2016/17

5.1 Whakatairanga mahi ā rēhia Recreation promotion and supportTop

Social and recreation performance story:

Drop in recreation satisfaction, begging a concern

The number of residents who agree that Wellington offers a wide range of recreation activities dropped 6 percent to 79 percent. Among the top reasons people gave for this was lack of time, cost of activities and lack of motivation. The number of people using libraries rose 8 percent to 82 percent. There was a notable increase in the number of people who are satisfied with the online library collection – this rose 16 percent to 87 percent.

In a survey measuring residents’ perception of city and community safety issues, 56 percent noted begging was a concern. There is no comparative figure for this particular measure as this is a new survey category.

Source: Wellington City Council Residents monitoring survey 2018

What we did:
Not met or decreased

79%

of survey respondents agree that Wellington offers a wide range of recreation activities

Among the top reasons people gave for this was lack of time, cost of activities and lack of motivation.

85% in 2016/17

 
Not measured or not comparable

19%

of survey respondents agree that there are barriers to participating in recreation activities

Refer supplementary tables – questions and categories changed this year.

 
Not measured or not comparable

56%

of survey respondents identified “begging” as particularly concerning in Wellington

“Begging” was a new survey category under city and community safety issues of most concern, added this year.

5.2 Tautoko hāpori Community supportTop

Positive Result

82%


 

Residents (%) who use our libraries

74% in 2016/17

 
Positive Result

71%


 

of survey respondents who state they use Wellington libraries more than once a month

65% in 2016/17

 
Positive Result

86%

Target 75%

E-library users (%) who are satisfied with the online library collection

86% in 2016/17

What we did:
Within 5% or no change

3.89m

Target 2.5 million

Library website visits.
Target was exceeded due to the including usage counts of the Wellington Central Library mini app as visits to the Library website

3.94m in 2016/17

5.3 Hauora/haumaru tūmatanui Public health and safetyTop

What we did:

Social and recreation financesTop

How it was funded

Services in this activity area are funded through a mixture of general rates and user charges.

What it cost (operating expenditure $000)
  2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Actual
  2017/18
Actual
2017/18
Budget
2017/18
Variance
5.1 Recreation promotion and support
             
Expenditure 37,886 38,493   42,069 40,998 (1,071)1
Revenue (11,301) (11,831)   (11,710) (11,710) -
Net Expenditure 26,585 26,662   30,359 29,288 (1,071)
5.2 Community support
             
Expenditure 51,745 56,009   56,751 57,674 9232
Revenue (36,104) (37,315)   (38,087) (37,285) 8023
Net Expenditure 15,641 18,694   18,664 20,389 1,725
5.3 Public health and safety
             
Expenditure 14,047 18,155   16,538 15,955 (583)
Revenue (4,101) (6,453)   (4,339) (4,190) 149
Net Expenditure 9,946 11,702   12,199 11,765 (434)
Social and recreation total
             
Expenditure 103,678 112,657   115,358 114,627 (731)
Revenue (51,506) (55,599)   (54,136) (53,185) 951
Net Expenditure 52,172 57,058   61,222 61,442 220
             

Variance explanations

1 Higher labour and professional costs along with greater depreciation expenditure than budgeted

2 Lower depreciation expenditure than budgeted

3 Timing of recognition of Crown funding for Housing Upgrade Programme partially offset by lower rental revenue from vacated social housing, pending upgrade

What it cost (capital expenditure $000)
  2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Actual
  2017/18
Actual
Brought forward from prior year 2017/18
Budget
2017/18
Variance
5.1 Recreation promotion and support
               
Expenditure 5,805 8,708   6,529 184 8,595 2,2501
5.2 Community support
               
Expenditure 19,652 18,756   32,725 21,463 13,960 2,6982
5.3 Public health and safety
               
Expenditure 812 2,721   999 - 2,129 1,1303
Social and recreation total
               
Expenditure 26,269 30,186   40,253 21,647 24,684 6,079
               
 

Variance explanations

1 Under budget due to timing of work on the completion of the Basin Reserve Master Plan

2 Under budget due to timing of work undertaken on the Johnsonville Library development project and with several of the community centre upgrades – Aro Valley, Kilbirnie, Newtown and Strathmore

3 Under budget due to timing of work undertaken on the public conveniences and pavilions work programme (Alex Moore Park, Ben Burn Park and Island Bay)

Social and recreation performanceTop

The following section outlines our performance data: outcome indicators, performance measures and supplementary tables.

We use outcome indicators to monitor our city over time, which provides information on trends that may influence our performance including those outside our control.

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets as set out in the 10-year and annual plans.

The Council undertakes the Residents’ Monitoring Survey (RMS) on an annual basis. The survey has a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percent.

Performance summary

The following table is a summary of how well we performed against our agreed outcome indicators and key performance measures for this activity area.

    Outcome indicator trends KPI compared to target KPI compared to last year

 
Positive Result Positive result 3 24 5

 
Within 5% or no change Within 5% or no change 7 6 29

 
Not met or decreased Not met or decreased 2 8 4

 
Not measured or not comparable Not measured or not comparable  7 1 1

 

Performance data – outcome indicators

The following section outlines outcome indicators for the Social and Recreation activity area. Outcome indicators do not have targets – only trend data.

Council outcome indicator Source   2015/16 2016/17   2017/18  
Residents' usage of City Council community and recreation facilities WCC RMS 2018  Community Centre 20% 23%   23% Within 5% or no change
    Community Hall 21% 19%   18% Within 5% or no change
Residents who agree that Wellington offers a wide range of recreation activities WCC RMS 2018   82% 85%   79% Not met or decreased
Residents' frequency of physical activity WCC RMS 2018   74% 73%   74% Within 5% or no change
Residents who perceive there to be barriers to participating in recreation activities WCC RMS 2018 See supplementary tables       19% say no barrier Not measured or not comparable
The survey question this measure was based upon has changed to "What, if anything, makes it difficult for you to take part in these recreational activities?" The five top answers are lack of time, too busy, activity costs too much, nothing or not interested, and lack of motivation. Refer to supplementary table for breakdown. Not all of the categories of answers are comparable to previous years data but we have aligned answers where possible alignments exist.  
               
Residents' importance of sense of community in local neighbourhood Quality of Life 2018

Biennial Result

75% -   68% Not met or decreased
Residents' usage of libraries and frequency of use WCC RMS 2018 Usage 73% 74%   82% Positive Result
    Frequency of use       71% more than once a month Positive Result
Residents who engage in neighbourly actions WCC RMS 2018 See supplementary tables Given help to a neighbour     58% Within 5% or no change
Housing Services tenants who report positive social contact 2018 Tenant Survey   94% 93%   94% Within 5% or no change
Residents' life expectancy Statistics NZ  Male       82.3 Not measured or not comparable
     Female       85.6 Not measured or not comparable
Residents' perception – city and community safety issues of most concern (downward trend is favourable) WCC RMS 2018 See supplementary tables       56% say begging of concern Within 5% or no change
Number of notifications of the most prevalent food and water-borne diseases (downward trend is favourable) WCC Public Health   197 207   175 to end February. Not measured or not comparable
Variance commentary: We ceased receiving notifications at end of February 2018 and no longer carry out investigations on behalf of Regional Public Health  
               
Food premises – number of cleaning notices and closures per year (downward trend is favourable) WCC Public Health Cleaning notices 8 10   NA Not measured or not comparable
    Closures 2 -   NA Not measured or not comparable
Food premises (%) with an inspection rating of excellent or very good that maintain or improve their inspection rating WCC Public Health   93% 96%   No longer applies due to transition to Food Act 2014 Not measured or not comparable
               
Changes to the Public Health (Food) Act 2014 mean that we will be introducing new KPIs in the next year. We ceased receiving notifications at the end of February 2018 and no longer carry out investigations on behalf of Regional Public Health.  
               
Number of uses of Leisure Card Recreation Wellington   138,447 141,763   150,166 Positive Result
Dog control – complaints received (% of registered dogs, downward trend is favourable) WCC Public Health   24% 21%   21% Within 5% or no change
Performance data – Council performance measures

The following section outlines Council performance measures for our Social and Recreation services. It includes data for the last 3 years to show trends, and includes variances explanations for relevant areas.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES  2015/16 2016/17   2017/18 Actual 2017/18 Target % Variance  
5.1 Recreation promotion and support
To measure the quality and usage (quantity) of the recreation facilities we provide
User (%) satisfaction – swimming pools    88% 87%   90% 90% 0% Positive Result
User (%) satisfaction  Recreation Centres 87% 88%   86% 90% -4% Within 5% or no change
User (%) satisfaction – sportsfields ASB Sports Centre 91% 95%   95% 90% 6% Positive Result
  Grass 73% 72%   73% 85% -14% Not met or decreased
  Artificial turf 84% 78%   81% 85% -5% Within 5% or no change
The great summer weather meant we did not have to close many grounds and cancel sport. However the very wet winter saw increased cancellations.
                 
Visits to facilities – swimming pools   1,300,700 1,318,555   1,236,169 1,260,000 -2% Within 5% or no change
Visits to facilities – recreation centres and ASB Sports Centre   1,077,573 1,223,588   1,206,688 1,060,000 14% Positive Result
ASB Sports Centre courts utilisation (%)    50% 56%   58% 45% 29% Positive Result
Sportsfields – % of scheduled sports games and training that take place Winter 79% 84%   71% 80% -11% Not met or decreased
  Summer 99% 92%   97% 90% 8% Positive Result
Artificial sportsfields % utilisation Peak Winter 68% 79%   79% 80% -1% Within 5% or no change
  Peak Summer 36% 34%   39% 40% -3% Within 5% or no change
  Off-peak Winter 15% 19%   16% 25% -36% Not met or decreased
  Off-peak Summer 10% 8%   9% 20% -55% Not met or decreased
The great summer weather meant there was less demand for use of artificial sportfields and very wet winter saw increased sports cancellations.  
                 
Marinas occupancy   96% 98%   98% 96% 2% Positive Result
PERFORMANCE MEASURES  2015/16 2016/17   2017/18 Actual 2017/18 Target % Variance  
5.2 Community support
To measure the quality and usage (quantity) of the housing services we provide
Tenants (%) who were satisfied with services and facilities 94% 96%   94% 90% 4% Positive Result
Tenant rating (%) of the overall condition of their house/apartment (average, good and very good) 96% 94%   93% 90% 3% Positive Result
Tenants (%) who felt safe in their complex at night 75% 78%   75% 75% 0% Positive Result
Occupancy rate of available housing facilities 94% 97%   96% 90% 6% Positive Result
All tenants (existing and new) housed within policy 99% 97%   98% 98% -1% Within 5% or no change
To measure the progress of the Housing Upgrade Project
Agreed milestones, design standards and budgets are met in accordance with the agreed works programme and Deed of Grant between the Crown and the Council Achieved Achieved   Achieved To Achieve Met Positive Result
To measure the quality and usage (quantity) of our community and recreation support services (including libraries)
Libraries – users (%) satisfied with services and facilities 93% 92%   92% 90% 2% Positive Result
E-library – users (%) satisfied with the online library collection 85% 86%   86% 75% 15% Positive Result
Consistent with previous results.  
               
Accessible Wellington Action Plan initiatives planned for next year 85% -   NA 90% met Within 5% or no change
As part of its commitment to improving accessibility in the city, the Council has developed a draft Accessible Wellington Action Plan. The plan is currently being considered before it can be taken to the next stage.
               
The proportion of grants fund successfully allocated (through milestones being met) 100% 92%   100% 95% 5% Positive Result
Proportion of outcomes delivered (previous projects) – weighted by $ value 100% 94%   NA 90% NA Not measured or not comparable
The outcomes are based on accountability reports submitted for grants approved during the financial year. Under our policy we give grantees 12 months from the grant decision to submit a report.
               
Libraries – residents (%) who are registered members 79% 84%   89% 75% 19% Positive Result
Targets have been recalibrated for next year as membership does not expire unless requested by the customer or next of kin  
               
Libraries – physical visits 2,248,409 2,159,555   2,440,718 2,400,000 2% Positive Result
Libraries – website visits 3,809,967 3,939,631   3,887,484 2,500,000 55% Positive Result 
Target was exceeded due to the including usage counts of the Wellington Central Library mini app as visits to the Library website.  
               
Library items issued 2,923,042 2,811,921   2,815,744 3,000,000 -6% Not met or decreased 
Occupancy rates (%) of Wellington City Council Community Centres and Halls 39% 45%   42% 45% -6% Not met or decreased 
PERFORMANCE MEASURE   2015/16 2016/17   2017/18 Actual 2017/18 Target % Variance  
5.3 Public health and safety
To measure the quality of our public health and safety services and programmes and our timeliness in responding to service requests
Dog control – urgent requests responded to within 1 hour and non-urgent requests responded to within 24 hours Urgent 100% 91%   93% 100% -7% Not met or decreased
  Non-urgent 100% 97%   96% 99% -3% Within 5% or no change
WCC public toilets – urgent requests responded to within 4 hours and non-urgent requests responded to within 3 days Urgent 100% 100%   98% 100% -2% Within 5% or no change
  Non-urgent 100% 98%   98% 95% 3% Positive Result
WCC public toilets (%) that meet required cleanliness and maintenance performance standards   100% 98%   96% 95% 1% Positive Result
Alcohol inspections (%) carried out for medium to very high-risk premises   100% 100%   88% 100% -13% Not met or decreased
Alcohol inspections (%) carried out for medium to very high-risk premises during trading hours   28% 17%   36% 25% 44% Positive Result
These two results for alcohol inspectations reflect the number of inspections carried out rather than the number of premises visited. As some premises are visited multiple times, the measure does not accurately demonstrate the effectiveness of performance and will be adjusted for next financial year.
                 
Graffiti removal – response time frames met    85% 83%   85% 80% 6% Positive Result

Performance data – supplementary tables
Residents' perceptions that there are barriers to participating in recreation activities 2014 2015 2016 2017   2018
    Org Participant
Lack of time due to commitments, childcare duties, other interests etc.           39% 34%
Too busy 45% 47% 43% 49%   29% 26%
Activity costs too much 36% 26% 29% 26%   25% 16%
Not interested 13% 10% 12% 14%   23% 14%
Nothing           16% 19%
Lack of motivation 23% 22% 22% 25%   20% 22%
Lack of knowledge about how to do it 13% 15% 12% 13%   14% 9%
Lack of transport   20% 22% 20%   11% 9%
Lack of parking           11% 9%
No easy access to facilities or parks nearby   1% 2% 2%   7% 6%
Poor health 9% 6% 8% 7%   6% 6%
Injury of disability           8% 8%
Cultural/language barriers           2% 2%
Don’t feel welcome           7% 3%
Safety concerns           2% 3%
Other (specify) 8% 8% 6% 7%   3% 3%
Don’t know   1% 0% 0%      
Organisation-led opportunities: These are formally organised with participation facilitated by a club or group and usually involving membership or subscription fees with participation opportunities provided via regular competition and events. Examples include playing competitive or social sport eg hockey, belonging to a tramping club or participating in a fun run series.
Participant-led opportunities: These are more informal and flexible allowing place and time to be determined by the participant. Maybe a pay for play component with costs to access a place or purchase equipment. Examples include swimming at a Council pool, shooting hoops at a local park, going for a walk along the waterfront.
 

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2018

Residents' usage (%) of libraries and frequency of use 2015 2016 2017   2018
More than once a week 4% 5% 6%   8%
Once a week 15% 15% 14%   16%
Once every 2–3 weeks 24% 20% 25%   28%
Once a month 19% 20% 20%   19%
Subtotal more than once a month 62% 60% 65%   71%
Once every 2–3 months 21% 19% 19%   16%
Once every 4–6 months 7% 12% 8%   7%
Less often than once every 6 months 8% 9% 8%   6%
Don’t know 1% 1% 0%   1%

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2018

Residents engaging in neighbourly actions 2015 2016 2017   2018
Spoken to a neighbour 92% 91% 89%   89%
Given help to a neighbour 58% 62% 55%   58%
Received help from a neighbour 47% 49% 46%   47%
Participated in an activity with a neighbour 38% 36% 33%   33%
Discussed emergency preparedness with a neighbour 16% 14% 21%   15%
None of the above 7% 7% 10%   9%

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2018

Residents' perceptions of city safety issues of most concern 2015 2016 2017   2018
Which of the following, if any, are particularly concerning in Wellington at present?
Begging (new in 2018)         56%
Poorly lit or dark public areas such as streets, paths and parks 61% 63% 59%   55%
Vandalism such as broken windows in shops and public buildings 26% 27% 17%   17%
Graffiti 34% 32% 16%   16%
Poorly maintained or dangerous public areas such as streets, paths and parks 34% 37% 32%   26%
Traffic, including busy roads and lack of pedestrian facilities 34% 33% 33%   36%
Dangerous driving including speeding, drunk drivers and so on 29% 30% 33%   33%
Alcohol and drug problems 51% 49% 46%   46%
Car theft or vandalism, and theft from cars 36% 32% 29%   27%
Threatening people and/or people behaving dangerously 48% 51% 46%   35%
Other (specify) 11% 10% 6%   8%
Nothing 5% 5% 3%   4%
Don’t know 1% 2% 1%   2%

Source: Wellington City Council Residents' Monitoring Survey 2018

Case study Connecting city communitiesTop

Helping neighbours get to know each other and live well is the focus of the Community Services' Resilience team.

“Our goal is to help people connect in their communities and live well through normal times but also through shocks and stresses,” says Jenny Rains, manager of Community Services.

Jenny grew up in Canada, where she worked with migrant and homeless communities in Vancouver, co-designed support programmes with Canada's northern and isolated communities, and supported volunteer programmes in the Maritime Provinces. Before joining the Council, Jenny also worked with the deaf and wider disability community in Wellington.

The Council’s role is one of facilitator, providing people with community resources and information on the spaces and activities that are available to them, and on emergency preparation.

“There are a lot of resources in the community. It’s about connecting those resources,” she says.

“A lot of people in the city centre move to be around other people, but have difficulty making those connections. Our role is to help people create an environment where they do interact and get to know each other,” Jenny says.

This work was prompted by feedback from city centre residents following the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake and during the Council’s emergency work. There was a real sense of vulnerability in central Wellington.

The initiative Connecting City Communities came out of a series of workshops and working groups with central city residents in 2017. It is a collaborative project with city residents and community groups that fosters neighbourhood connections in central city apartment buildings. This includes fresh takes on communal meals, re-imagining public spaces, group recreational activities, or community art exhibitions.

Mark Noyes, who is leading this work in Jenny’s team, cites the example of a Chilean apartment dweller who wanted to organise a communal meal for the building’s residents after tensions arose. This approach was something of a tradition in his home country.

“You don’t have to be good friends with the people around you. But it’s important for you to know something about them and for them to know something about you,” Mark says.