Our performance in detail

1
Mana Whakahaere
Governance

This chapter profiles our strategic approach, challenges and what we delivered in the governance area, which includes governance, information and engagement work, and Māori and mana whenua partnerships.

Snapshot of the city

Snapshot

1 Mana Whakahaere
Governance Top

Introduction

As part of our strategic approach towards governance, we seek to build public confidence in our decisions by being as transparent as possible, clearly communicating the reasons for the things we do and encouraging public participation in the decision-making process. This is because high levels of public involvement in what we do make for better and more enduring decisions.

A key challenge is to continue to improve on the levels of engagement and participation in our decision-making processes, and events like local elections.

This year’s highlight was the record turnout we obtained during the consultation on Our 10-Year Plan 2018-28, which saw around 2000 people submitting feedback, including a significant proportion of young people. We will look at what we did well and apply it to future consultations to further improve how we communicate and engage with Wellingtonians.

Our governance portfolio includes the work we do to ensure the role of Māori in the city is valued and reflected in all aspects of our work, from resource management and economic development to social wellbeing and the arts. The Council is subject to a range of legal obligations and Te Tiriti o Waitangi considerations. This year we took the significant step of implementing a te reo Māori policy to make the language more visible in our everyday lives.

Governance performance story:

We’re improving but there’s work to be done

We’ve made progress in the way we engage with the public on decisions about Wellington. A significant highlight this year was the high level of feedback we received on Our 10-Year Plan 2018-28. We also engaged more actively with residents, communities and stakeholders on other topics, including our te reo Māori policy and Let’s Get Wellington Moving.

We need to do more to make our information clear and accessible, and to make it easy for people to engage with our decision-making processes.

Source: Wellington City Council Residents monitoring survey 2018

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48%


 

Residents (%) who agree that decisions are made in the best interests of the city

51% in 2016/17

 
Image

40%


 

Residents (%) who state that they understand how the Council makes decisions

39% in 2016/17

 
Image

59%

Target 55%

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the level of consultation (ie the right amount)

55% in 2016/17



Image

72%

Target 75%

Residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making

79% in 2016/17

 
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76%

Target 75%

Māori residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making

68% in 2016/17

1.1 Mana Whakahaere, Pārongo me ngā mahi whai wāhi Governance, information and engagementTop

What we did:

We consulted on a range of projects, initiatives, policies and plans, including:

Governance performance story:

We’re improving but there’s work to be done

We’ve made progress in the way we engage with the public on decisions about Wellington. A significant highlight this year was the high level of feedback we received on Our 10-Year Plan 2018-28. We also engaged more actively with residents, communities and stakeholders on other topics, including our te reo Māori policy and Let’s Get Wellington Moving.

We need to do more to make our information clear and accessible, and to make it easy for people to engage with our decision-making processes.

Source: Wellington City Council Residents monitoring survey 2018

Image

48%


 

Residents (%) who agree that decisions are made in the best interests of the city

51% in 2016/17

 
Image

40%


 

Residents (%) who state that they understand how the Council makes decisions

39% in 2016/17

 
Image

59%

Target 55%

Residents (%) who are satisfied with the level of consultation (ie the right amount)

55% in 2016/17

1.2 Rangapū Māori/mana whenua Māori and mana whenua partnershipsTop

What we did:
Image

72%

Target 75%

Residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making

79% in 2016/17

 
Image

76%

Target 75%

Māori residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making

68% in 2016/17

Governance financesTop

How it was funded

Services in this activity area are mostly funded through general rates, with a small portion funded through fees and user charges for Civic Information and City Archives.

What it cost (operating expenditure $000)
  2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Actual
  2017/18
Actual
2017/18
Budget
2017/18
Variance
1.1 Governance, information and engagement
             
Expenditure 15,974 16,877   17,214 18,660 1,446
Revenue (751) (1,005)   (498) (537) (39)
Net Expenditure 15,223 15,873   16,716 18,123 1,4071
1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships
             
Expenditure 274 279   305 300 (5)
Revenue - 1   (4) - 4
Net Expenditure 274 280   301 300 (1)
Governance total
             
Expenditure 16,248 17,157   17,519 18,960 1,441
Revenue (751) (1,004)   (502) (537) (35)
Net Expenditure 15,497 16,153   17,017 18,423 1,406
             

Variance explanations

1 Under budget due to lower personnel costs and professional fees

What it cost (capital expenditure $000)
  2015/16
Actual
2016/17
Actual
  2017/18
Actual
Brought forward from prior year 2017/18
Budget
2017/18
Variance
1.1 Governance, information and engagement
               
Expenditure - -   8   - (8)
Governance total
               
Expenditure - -   8 8 - (0)
               

Governance performanceTop

The following section outlines our performance data: outcome indicators, performance measures and supplementary tables.

We use outcome indicators to monitor our city over time, which provides information on trends that may influence our performance, including those outside our control.

We use performance measures to track how well we are delivering services against targets, as set out in the 10-year and annual plans.

The Council undertakes the Residents’ Monitoring Survey (RMS) on an annual basis. The survey has a margin of error of +/- 3.1 percent.

Performance summary

The following table is a summary of how well we performed against our agreed outcome indicators and key performance measures for this activity area.

    Outcome indicator trends KPI compared
to target
KPI compared to last year

 
Positive Result Positive result - 6 5

 
Within 5% or no change Within 5% or no change 5 3 4

 
Not met or decreased Not met or decreased - 1 1

 
Not measured or not comparable Not measured or not comparable 1 - -

 

Performance data – outcome indicators

The following section outlines outcome indicators for the Governance activity area. Outcome indicators do not have targets – only trend data.

Council outcome indicator Source   2015/16 2016/17   2017/18  
Residents (%) who agree that decisions are made in the best interests of the city WCC RMS 2018   36% 51%   48% Within 5% or no change
Residents (%) who state that they understand how the Council makes decisions WCC RMS 2018   33% 39%   40% Within 5% or no change
Residents (%) who understand how they can have input into Council decision-making WCC RMS 2018   46% 43%   46% Within 5% or no change
Mana whenua partners agree that the use and protection of the city's resources for the future is appropriate WCC Strategy and Research   1 Agreed and
1 Partner was not sure
Both partners were not sure   Both partners were not sure Within 5% or no change
Residents (%) who believe they have the opportunity to participate in city life WCC RMS 2018   74% 69%   70% Within 5% or no change
Voter turnout in local elections, referendums and polls WCC Democratic Services     2016
45.6%
  NA Not measured or not comparable

Performance data – Council performance measures

The following section outlines Council performance measures for our Governance services. It includes data for the last 3 years to show trends, and includes variances explanations for relevant areas.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES  2015/16 2016/17   2017/18 Actual 2017/18 Target % Variance  
1.1 Governance, information and engagement
To measure the quality of the public's involvement in Council decision-making
Residents (%) who are satisfied with the level of consultation (ie the right amount) 54% 55%   59% 55% 7% Positive Result
Residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement with decision-making 70% 79%   72% 75% -4% Within 5% or no change
To measure the quality and timeliness of residents' access to information
Council and committee agendas (%) are made available to the public within statutory time frames (2 working days prior to the meeting) 94% 95%   100% 100% 0% Positive Result
Council and committee agendas (%) that are made available to elected members 5 days prior to the meeting and to the public 4 days prior to the meeting 91% 79%   88% 80% 11% Positive Result
Sound decision-making relies on the timely delivery of meeting papers. Councillors and the public need time to consider agenda material and prepare for meetings. There have been improvements in this area and Council officers will endeavour to maintain this trend.
               
Residents (%) who agree that Council information is easy to access (eg from the website, libraries, newspapers, etc) 49% 55%   58% 60% -3% Within 5% or no change
Residents (%) who agree that the Council website is easy to navigate and get information from 61% 64%   63% 75% -16% Not met or decreased
Our result is in line with previous years. However, we fell short of the increased target.
The Council is working on a ‘News and Information’ feature for the website and will continue to improve search functions for common service queries.
               
Contact Centre response times – calls (%) answered within 30 seconds 80% 73%   78% 80% -3% Within 5% or no change
We improved our level of service after implementing a new automated phone system.
               
Contact Centre response times – emails (%) responded to within 24 hours 93% 98%   100% 100% 0% Positive Result
1.2 Māori and mana whenua partnerships 
To measure the health of our relationship with mana whenua
Mana whenua partner satisfaction with Council relationship (satisfied and very satisfied) satisfied satisfied   satisfied satisfied met Positive Result
To measure the engagement of the city's Māori residents
Māori residents (%) who are satisfied or neutral (neither satisfied nor dissatisfied) with regard to their involvement in decision-making  65% 68%   76% 75% 1% Positive Result

Case study Te Tauihu, our te reo Māori policyTop

Watene Campbell and Rāhiri Wharerau are both 17 years old. They have known each other since they were 4 years old. Rāhiri, who has a wicked sense of humour, has his own version of the first time the two boys met, which Watene disputes.

“It was circa 2006,” Rāhiri muses. “I bowled him over on the rugby field.”

They are both smart, funny boys, who are committed to promoting the Māori language and culture.

“Having a sense of belonging helps us carry on in our everyday lives,” says Watene.

“I’ve been raised in a Māori environment and I want to do more for my people and culture.”

Rāhiri feels the same. He sees it as a ‘duty’ to do everything he can to promote Māori culture.

The boys were the young ambassadors of the Council’s te reo Māori policy, which came into effect on 27 June 2018. They helped launch the policy and promote its importance through a series of videos, an appearance at the City Strategy Committee and stage presence at the Newtown Festival.

“It was really fun,” says Rāhiri.

In February and March 2018, the Council consulted the public on the draft policy and received 589 submissions. The policy reflects a commitment to make Māori culture and language an integral part of everyday life.

“It’s definitely going to make a difference. To understand the culture, you first need to understand the language,” says Rāhiri.

The boys lead busy lives. Rāhiri is into basketball and drama while Watene paddles and plays rugby. They both attend Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Mokopuna, a Māori school in Seatoun.

They are focused on their studies and thinking about the next stage in their lives. Rāhiri aspires to be ‘the Māori Leonardo di Caprio’ while Watene says he hasn’t made his mind up yet. He thinks he may become a lawyer because he’s always enjoyed arguing and debating issues.

Whatever they do next, it will be infused with a strong sense of culture and identity.

“Māori culture and language matters. We want to keep it alive for future generations,” says Watene.

Rāhiri Wharerau, left, and Watene Campbell, right